Posted by: macahajo | October 12, 2014

Fabric Shopping

What do I do when Hannah or I need a new skirt or dress? We can’t just run out to our favorite and familiar clothing store like we use to do in the States. Here in Yaounde, Cameroon, we go fabric shopping!

There are many small boutiques that line the streets, with cement floors, where people barter for the fabric cost. A friend and I recently drove to one of the bigger fabric shops in the city. This store is clean, organized, and has set prices.

I felt like a kid in a candy shop! There were so many beautiful fabrics to choose from, with so many different colors and patterns!  It was hard to decide what to buy! But, after looking around the whole store for some time, I finally made my choice!

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The next step: Remedy came over!  She came to us highly recommended.  Remedy is a follower of Jesus, and a sweet mommy of two little ones. She is an excellent seamstress who made the curtains for our home, and who made the dresses and skirts for Hannah and I from the fabric that we chose.

We have learned that the way people dress is very important in Cameroon. The Cameroonian people know the fabric well. They know if it is cheap or expensive. They know what part of Cameroon it comes from, or if it is imported from another country like Nigeria.  They say, “The way you are dressed, so shall you be addressed.”   When Cameroonians go to someone’s home for dinner, they dress very nicely, to show respect and honor to those whom they’re visiting.  When a Cameroonian woman goes before her elders, she doesn’t wear anything short or sleeveless.

When they see Cameroonian ladies wear short shorts, other Cameroonians think that they come from bad families and think that the women might be prostitutes. One Cameroonian woman I spoke to recently said that they recognize that this is how westerners dress, but they don’t like that kind of influence on their people. We have only seen a couple girls in Yaounde wearing really short shorts, but we have seen more, wearing short skirts, but this is still a very small percentage.

How we dress could be an obstacle to those who listen to us, so we need to be careful of what we choose to wear.

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Blessings, Cathy Lynn

#LifeinAfrica


Responses

  1. Two of my beautiful ladies.

  2. This isn’t facebook, but if it was, I’d ‘like’ your comment, mom 🙂 Love you!


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