Posted by: macahajo | November 1, 2014

What’s in your grocery bag?!

There is a local grocery store, about 5 minutes away from our home, where we can shop for some grocery items like cereal, canned goods, and bathroom supplies. They also have a bakery.

However,  they are fairly limited in their over-all selection, so we usually plan a big shopping trip about once a month, to down-town Yaounde, which is about 45 minutes away, depending on traffic. We often go to a grocery store called Mahima that has a nice selection of items. Another store we shop at is Centragel; a smaller store owned by a French man, where we can buy chicken, beef, cheese, cereal, as well as frozen foods like vegetables and fruits that we can’t buy fresh here in Cameroon (like corn and strawberries).   In the city, there are several bakeries. We just found one that sells hotdog buns for 10 cents each, and hamburger buns too, among many delicious looking pastries and ice-cream!

Many of the Western products tend to cost more.  A can of beans and a can of spaghetti sauce each costs $3.  Pringles cost close to $4 per can. Ice-cream is about $12 for about a gallon. A liter of pop costs about $2. They have Coke and Sprite, but no Root-beer.  At another store, Landmark, we recently found a can of Dr. Pepper for $3 – oh my! – and generic mac n cheese for $3 as well.

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This TRESemme Shampoo, pictured below, only costs about $15 at Landmark -yikes!-  Shampoo and conditioner tends to be pricey here.

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Within walking distance, at our local shacks, or boutiques as they call them here, we can buy a simple baguette for 25 cents, 2 pounds of flour for just under one dollar, and 2 pounds of sugar for about $1.50.

Patrick, better known as the apple man among our neighbors, comes to our door each Monday selling apples; beautiful red and green apples that come from France and South Africa.  He sells them for about 50 cents each. Patrick pastors a smaller congregation in Yaounde; selling apples is one way that he can provide food for his family.

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Papa John is the bread man!  He is an older man of about 70 years who also comes to our door on Monday’s. He sells 20 large home-made tortillas for just under $5, 12 rolls for $3, 6 bagels for $2, and a loaf of bread for $2.  He competes with the Tortilla Lady and the Bagel Lady for our business, and for the business of many other expats who live in our neighborhood as well!

In the market, there is the white man’s price, and there is the Cameroonian’s price.  Adaline, a native Cameroonian, goes to the outdoor market for us because she gets the best prices for our fruits and vegetables.  It recently cost us about $15 for the following: 10 limes, 10 lemons, 7 tomatoes, 18 potatoes, 1 pineapple, a little green onion, and some lettuce and spinach.

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Other fruits that you can get here include mango, watermelon, papaya, bananas, tangerines, and oranges.

If I’m picky about a particular brand, like my Cetaphil face lotion, then I need to pack enough when I’m in the States, to last a long time, because I probably won’t find it here (or if I can find it here, it would probably be quite pricey like the TRESemme shampoo)!

We’re thankful that overall, there is so much available!

… That’s a little idea of what’s in our grocery bags here in Yaounde! 

Blessings, Cathy Lynn

#lifeinafrica

 


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